Best 8 Effective Hand Stitches For Embroidery
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  • Sewing Tips
  • Posted February 25, 2016
Best 8 Effective Hand Stitches For Embroidery

Hand Stitches For Embroidery

Hand Stitches For Embroidery

Embroidery is easy, relaxing, and one of the least expensive hobbies you can take up. At first, I know it sounds painstaking, time-consuming, and intimidating. But believe me, this is a deceptively simple craft. You just need the eagerness to learn and be patient on whatever you will do. Aside from that, you must learn the basic elements of this craft. To help you with that, here are some hand stitches that you must know:

Running Stitch

The running stitch is good for outlining an embroidery design. It is a very quick stitch to do. The first method to do the running stitch is similar to hand sewing and can be completed by pushing the needle and floss in and over the fabric in one continuous motion. The second method can be literally pushing the needle through the fabric and pulling it back up.

Back Stitch

The backstitch creates a solid line and is good for hand embroidering text or outlining a design. Start by pulling the needle and floss up through the fabric and do one stitch forward. From underneath, space the needle out the length of your desired stitch, pull up through the fabric, and bring the needle and floss back down through the end of the previous stitch.

Slip Stitch

The split stitch creates a solid line with an added touch to it. This stitch is suitable for text and outline as well. It also works to fill designs and create variation from the running or backstitch. To start, pull your needle and floss up through the fabric and create one straight stitch. Your needle and floss should be on the underside of your hoop. Bring the needle up through the center of the stitch you just created and stitch forward the same length as your initial stitch. Repeat by bringing the needle up through the center of each stitch.

Satin Stitch

The satin stitch creates an even appearance. It is usually used to fill in hearts or the leaves of flowers. To begin, take your needle and floss and create one stitch. Bring the needle up again just next to the opposite side of the initial stitch. Keep the stitches close to one another, as required to fill the pattern or design you are working with.

Stem Stitch

This stitch is usually used for the stems of flowers or vines, that’s why it is called stem stitch. It can curve nicely with letters; thus, it is very recommendable for making texts. Similar to the split stitch, you create one straight stitch forward and bring the needle and floss up underneath the fabric, but instead of going through the center of this initial stitch, you will bring the needle up just to the side of the stitch.

French Knots

French Knots can be used to accent designs or create fun fillers for most designs. You’ll have to use two hands to create the French Knot by bringing the needle and floss up through the fabric and wrapping the floss around the needle twice. Hold the end of the floss taut and bring the needle down just next to the space where it came out through. Keep holding the floss taut as you pull the needle through. You can vary the size of your French knots by wrapping the floss around the needle anywhere between one and three times.

Chain Stitch

Chain stitch makes for a great outline stitch as well as a frame for a pattern or design. Take your needle and floss and create a stitch, but before you pull the floss all the way through the fabric, allow it to form a loop. Bring the needle up through that loop in order to tether it from being pulled all the way through the fabric and pull. Place the needle either directly in the hole you just stitched, or close to it, and pull through creating another loop by not pulling the floss completely through the fabric. Pull the needle up through the loop to tether it and pull. Repeat the steps to continue the chain. When you reach the end of the chain, simply create a small stitch over the loop.

Lazy Daisy

This is a version of the chain stitch often referred to as the “detached chain stitch” or “lazy daisy.” Instead of continuing the chain, there is a small stitch made just over the end of the loop to create what looks like a daisy petal. Just like the chain stitch, take your needle and floss and create a stitch, but before you pull the floss all the way through the fabric, allow it to form a loop. Bring the needle up through that loop in order to tether it from being pulled all the way through the fabric and create a small stitch over the top of the loop. Space out the next loop or use the stitch to create a daisy.

Alvin

Alvin is a fashion and lifestyle writer who has recently earned interest in sewing his own clothes. Writing for Sewing Ideas gives him another avenue to express his experiences and learning in his sewing journey.


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