How to Choose the Perfect Thread for Sewing Project
  • By
  • Dresses, Sewing Tips, Sewing Tutorials
  • Posted January 12, 2016
How to Choose the Perfect Thread for Sewing Project

How to Choose the Perfect Thread for Your Sewing Project

How to Choose the Perfect Thread for Your Sewing Project

We all know that the thread type is chosen for its compatibility with the fabric’s structure and fiber content, as well as the type of project being worked on. There are many types of threads – carpet thread, darning thread, embroidery thread, crochet thread, basting thread, and buttonhole twist as examples. This article will deal only with the threads that are primarily used with most projects done on a sewing machine.

The following shows various types of sewing thread and their usage. Where size numbers apply, the higher the number, the finer the thread – the median size is 50. Where letters indicate the size, A is fine and D is heavy.

Introducing the General Purpose Threads

COTTON

Cotton sewing threads.(Picture from www.laurelleaffarm.com)

A medium thickness (size 50) is available in a wide range of colors, and is used for sewing on light and medium weight cottons, rayons and linens. Cotton thread is usually mercerized, a finishing process that makes it smooth and lustrous, also helping it to take dye better. The lack of “give” in cotton thread makes it an unwise choice for knits or other stretchy fabrics, as the stitches will tend to pop.

SILK

A fine (size A) strong thread for sewing on silk and wool. Its fineness makes it ideal for basting all fabric types, as it does not leave holes from stitching or imprints after pressing. Because of its elasticity, silk is also suitable for sewing any type of knit. Silk thread is recommended for tailoring because it can be molded along with the fabric in shaped areas.

NYLON

Nylon sewing threads.(Picture fromwww.aadinaththread.com)

A fine (size A) strong thread for sewing light to medium weight synthetics. This is especially suited to nylon tricot.

POLYESTER

An all-purpose weight (approximately size 50) is suitable for sewing on most fabrics, but particularly recommended for woven synthetics; also for knits and other stretch fabrics of any fiber. Most polyester threads have a wax or silicone finish helping them slip through the fabric with a minimum of friction.

COTTON-WRAPPED POLYESTER

COTTON-WRAPPED POLYESTER(Picture from www.superiorthreads.com)

It’s an all-purpose weight (approximately size 50) for sewing on knits or wovens of synthetic or natural fibers or blends. The polyester core gives this type of thread strength and elasticity, the cotton wrapping gives it a tough, heat resistant surface.

The Heavy Duty Threads

Heavy duty sewing threads.(Picture from www.etsy.com)

COTTON; POLYESTER; COTTON-WRAPPED POLYESTER: These are coarse threads (approximately size 40) used where extra strength is required for sewing of heavy vinyl, coating or upholstery fabrics.

Regardless of the project you will be working on, it is very important to purchase a good quality thread. The “5 spools of thread for a buck” is not a bargain. The fibers of the “bargain” thread splits easily while you’re sewing and can cause knotting of the thread, breakage of the thread and can also cause a build-up of lint in the bobbin area and along the thread line from the spool to the needle. If you hold a length of the bargain thread up to a light you can readily see the frayed edges and roughness of the thread.

When buying thread for your project it is recommended that you select thread one shade darker than the fabric in order for it to blend in harmoniously. If the fabric is a plaid or multi-color print, select that color that is most dominant.

Alvin

Alvin is a fashion and lifestyle writer who has recently earned interest in sewing his own clothes. Writing for Sewing Ideas gives him another avenue to express his experiences and learning in his sewing journey.


Latest Posts

Newsletter

Subscribe to our newsletter for good news, sent out every week.